Thats the Spot!

Thats the Spot!

 

Hardware Components Used

  • 1 Green LED
  • 2 Yellow LED
  • 3 330 Ω Resistors
  • 2 10k Resistors
  • 1 Servo Motor
  • Arduino Uno Board
  • Breadboard
  • 5-volt power
  • Soft Potentiometer
  • Flex sensor
  • Cardboard
  • Ducktape
  • Piezo Buzzer
  • 14 wires

Concept

 

Description:

That’s the Spot! is an interactive game where the interactor controls a servo motor with a soft potentiometer. The motor head collides and bends a flex sensor. As the flex sensor bends, the LEDs will light up from yellow to green. If the interactor discovers the “spot” and holds the position, the piezo buzzer will play a jingle. After the interaction, the system resets and a new spot is selected for a different experience.

As they interact, the interactor should feel determined. They should feel the struggle to find the correct spot to complete the sequence. The personal value of the piece was the challenge of the flex sensor and the board design. Since the breadboard is small, I struggled to create a smooth interaction between the servo and flex sensor. Besides the design, the flex sensor sensitivity is short. I mapped and constrained the values for the interaction to work correctly.

Possible idea for the structure:

I envision this piece as being contained within an acrylic structure with one side being brass. The side of brass would be the interface with the soft pot and LEDs connected too. The rest of the piece would be a clear shell which will allow the interactor to view all the working parts interacting with itself. The style would be a mix of steampunk and sciFi.

To fill the negative space within the shell, there would be a mess of colorful wires. Example: 

 

Simon Says…PhotoResistor

Simon Says … Photo-resistor

Hardware Components Used

  • 1 Photo-resistor
  • 1 RGB LED
  • 1 Yellow LED
  • 4 330 Ω Resistors
  • 2 10k Resistors
  • 1 Switch
  • 10 Wires
  • Arduino Uno Board
  • 1 Breadboard
  • 5 volt power

Concept

 

Description:

Simon says…Photo-resistor is an interactive game using a photo-resistor as the main input for the experience. As the user presses the button, the game begins. The RGB turns white and begins the blue blinking a randomized sequence. The number of blinks is the required number of times the user needs to flash a light towards the photo-resistor to win the game. During the “input” phase, the RGB led light blinks RED and GREEN indicating the time left. If the player fails to complete the sequence, the RGB LED will turn RED indicating they failed. If the player completes the sequence, the RGB LED will turn GREEN indicating they have won.  After the complete phase, either win or lose, the game will reset and idle until the button is pushed to start again.

As this piece resembles a game, the emotional response would be excitement, panic, and joy. The personal value of the piece was the challenge of coding and using a photo-resistor. As it was the first time I would have worked with one, I ran into some issues with calibration. Ultimately, I believe this piece was sacksful. It allowed me to push myself and try something different that was out of my comfort-zone.

Permadeath Faceware


I created a modular rig solution to be used for permadeath current and future characters. The rig needed to be combined with a prior human-ik rig and have no noticeable lag for real time playback. I determined that a bone rig was best solution for the project prior to testing of blendshapes. Using a skeleton system, the joint layout was critical so special attention was used to determine correct placement.

In Unreal engine, I used the node base coding, blueprints. The network of nodes affects rotation and vector movement of each required joint. There is a total of 28 of facial shapes that was created for the live animation.


Software:

Autodesk Maya

Faceware Live Server

Unreal Engine